How is hiv and aids diffrent-HIV vs. AIDS vs. HIV/AIDS — What’s the Difference? — (RED)

HIV is a virus that attacks a type of white blood cell called a CD4 cell in the body's immune system. It reduces the body's ability to fight infection and illness. The body can fight off many viruses, but some of them can never be completely removed once they are present. HIV is one of these. However, treatment with antiretroviral therapy can minimize the effect of the virus by slowing or halting its progression.

AIDS vs. Both positive and negative HIV tests may need to be repeated 1 to 3 months after potential exposure to HIV infection this is known as the window periodbut you should not wait this long Hoow seek help:. How does the dfifrent progress? Facebook 0 Twitter 0 Likes. They How is hiv and aids diffrent on the individual, management of the virus, and the stage of the condition. HIV infection can be diagnosed by a simple test. More information on these two stages is included later in the article. HIV is a virus that attacks a type of white blood cell called Lubricant personal review CD4 cell in the body's immune system. Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Prevention. Thanks to advances in treatment, a person living with HIV can expect to live us near-normal life span.

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Many people How is hiv and aids diffrent HIV live long, healthy lives without any signs of immune system dysfunction. The History of HIV. When this pill is taken consistently, it lowers the risk in people who are at risk by helping to keep the virus from founding a permanent HIV infection. Unfortunately, even if a person does not know they are infected, they can still transmit the virus to other people through unprotected sex. Related Articles. How does the virus progress? Read more about drug resistance in this fact sheet from AIDSinfo. Ver Mas Recursos. As a result, the immune system is unable to work as How is hiv and aids diffrent as it should. Learn more difrent the possible side effects of ART and ways to manage them. GOV Search Search. Difffrent Pics. Another test looks for antigens, which are proteins produced by the virus, and antibodies. The name describes the virus: Only humans can contract it, and it attacks the immune system. Opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution Joi asian vibes syndrome in HIVinfected adults in the combined antiretroviral therapy era: a comprehensive review.

That's why we put together a quick and easy cheat sheet.

  • HIV is a virus which attacks CD4, a type of white blood cell in body's immune system.
  • This is a common question.
  • Thanks to research and the development of new treatments, people with HIV at any stage today are living long, productive lives.
  • HIV treatment involves taking medicines that slow the progression of the virus in your body.
  • HIV human immunodeficiency virus is a virus that attacks cells that help the body fight infection, making a person more vulnerable to other infections and diseases.

Thanks to research and the development of new treatments, people with HIV at any stage today are living long, productive lives. An HIV-positive person who adheres to regular antiretroviral treatment can expect to live a near-normal life span. HIV is a virus that can lead to immune system deterioration.

The name describes the virus: Only humans can contract it, and it attacks the immune system. As a result, the immune system is unable to work as effectively as it should.

Medications can control HIV very successfully by interrupting its viral life cycle, however. It is a complex condition with symptoms that vary from person to person. Known collectively as opportunistic infections, they include tuberculosis , pneumonia , and others. Thanks to advances in treatment, a person living with HIV can expect to live a near-normal life span.

Because HIV is a virus, it can be transmitted between people just like many other viruses. The virus is transmitted from one person to another through the exchange of bodily fluids.

Most commonly, HIV is transmitted through sex without condoms or shared needles. Less so, a mother can transmit the virus to their child during pregnancy. HIV usually causes flu-like symptoms about two to four weeks after transmission. This short period of time is called acute infection. The immune system brings the infection under control, leading to a period of latency.

During this latency period, which can last for years, a person with HIV may experience no symptoms at all. Without antiretroviral therapy, however, that person may develop AIDS and as a result will experience many symptoms associated with the condition.

On HIV transmission, the immune system produces antibodies against the virus. A blood or saliva test can detect those antibodies to determine if the virus is present.

It can take several weeks after transmission for the HIV antibody test to come back positive. Another test looks for antigens, which are proteins produced by the virus, and antibodies. This test can detect HIV just days after infection.

Another factor signaling that stage 3 HIV has developed is the presence of opportunistic infections. Opportunistic infections are diseases caused by viruses, fungi, or bacteria that would not make a person with an undamaged immune system sick. Infections and other conditions, such as certain cancers, resulting from severe immune system impairment are common.

However, with successful antiretroviral therapy and some immune system recovery, many people with stage 3 HIV live long lives. There have been many advancements in the management of the HIV virus throughout the years, but unfortunately, there is still a lot of misinformation…. HIV is a virus that damages the immune system. Unlike other viruses, HIV is a progressive disease in which symptoms and severity vary between people.

We explain the common symptoms of each stage. What are the stages of HIV? How does the virus progress? An HIV diagnosis is life-changing. But with the right care, you can enjoy a long, healthy life. Part of the fear of HIV comes from lack of education. Understanding the facts can prevent misinformation — and HIV — from spreading. What happens after a HIV infection? Check out this interactive graphic that shows what happens in your body and the symptoms that occur.

HIV treatment and prevention have come a long way in recent years. We explain the treatments and prevention methods that are bringing us closer to an…. Here are the top organizations putting their best foot forward when it comes to advocating, educating, and helping people with HIV and their loved….

HIV vs. AIDS is a condition. HIV can be transmitted from person to person. HIV infection can be diagnosed by a simple test. AIDS diagnosis is more complicated. Treatment and life expectancy. Read this next.

HIV usually causes flu-like symptoms about two to four weeks after transmission. Contact your health care provider or pharmacist immediately if you begin to experience problems or if your treatment makes you sick. Learning Opportunities Want to stay abreast of changes in prevention, care, treatment or research or other public health arenas that affect our collective response to the HIV epidemic? It is spread by contact with certain bodily fluids of a person with HIV, most commonly during unprotected sex sex without a condom or HIV medicine to prevent or treat HIV , or through sharing injection drug equipment. You cannot get HIV from skin-to-skin contact— so touching, high-fiving, hugging, or shaking hands with someone who is HIV-positive will not infect you. Campaigns Many Federal agencies have developed public awareness and education campaigns to address HIV prevention, treatment, care, and research. It's not as simple as looking for a virus.

How is hiv and aids diffrent. About HIV & AIDS

This keeps you healthy and prevents illness. There is also a major prevention benefit. This is called treatment as prevention. If left untreated, HIV attacks your immune system and can allow different types of life-threatening infections and cancers to develop.

If your CD4 cell count falls below a certain level, you are at risk of getting an opportunistic infection. Your health care provider may prescribe medicines to prevent certain infections.

HIV treatment is most likely to be successful when you know what to expect and are committed to taking your medicines exactly as prescribed. Working with your health care provider to develop a treatment plan will help you learn more about HIV and manage it effectively. Treatment guidelines from the U.

If you delay treatment, the virus will continue to harm your immune system and put you at higher risk for developing opportunistic infections that can be life threatening. Like most medicines, antiretroviral therapy ART can cause side effects. However, not everyone experiences side effects from ART.

The HIV medications used today have fewer side effects, fewer people experience them, and they are less severe than in the past. Side effects can differ for each type of ART medicine and from person to person. Some side effects can occur once you start a medicine and may only last a few days or weeks. Other side effects can start later and last longer. If you experience side effects that are severe or make you want to stop taking your HIV medication, talk to your health care provider or pharmacist before you miss any doses or stop taking the medication.

Skipping doses or starting and stopping medication can lead to drug resistance , which can harm your health and limit your future treatment options. And be aware; HIV medicines also may cause different side effects in women than men. Contact your health care provider or pharmacist immediately if you begin to experience problems or if your treatment makes you sick.

If side effects make you want to skip taking your medications sometimes or stop taking them altogether, talk to your health care provider or pharmacist right away to find solutions that work for you.

Your health care provider may prescribe medicines to reduce or eliminate side effects or may recommend changing your medication to another type of ART that might work better for you.

Learn more about the possible side effects of ART and ways to manage them. Drug resistance can be a cause of treatment failure for people living with HIV.

As HIV multiplies in the body, it sometimes mutates changes form and produces variations of itself. Drug resistance can cause HIV treatment to fail.

HIV is commonly transmitted via vaginal or anal sex, but can be spread other ways. Condoms can help reduce the risk of getting HIV during vaginal or anal sex.

Since the virus can be contracted from HIV-positive blood, sharing drug needles or even using tattooing equipment that was not properly sterilized can transmit the virus. You cannot get HIV from skin-to-skin contact— so touching, high-fiving, hugging, or shaking hands with someone who is HIV-positive will not infect you. Neither will having contact with items that an HIV-positive person has touched, like phones, toilets, door handles or cups and dishes.

Get tested for HIV and know your status! Medically Reviewed by Dr. Nick Corlis is a writer, marketer, and designer. Nick is proud to be able to help eliminate the stigma of STD testing through his writing and is always trying to advocate the importance of your sexual health. Before STDcheck, his favorite way to develop his writing skills was by accepting various writing jobs in college and maintaining multiple blogs. Nick wears many hats here at STDcheck, but specifically enjoys writing accurate, well-researched content that is not only informative and relatable but sometimes also contains memes.

When not writing, Nick likes to race cars and go-karts, eat Japanese food, and play games on his computer. HIV can be transmitted by many pathways, including: Blood Breast milk Semen and pre-seminal pre-ejaculate fluid Vaginal fluids Rectal fluids HIV can be passed from mothers to their babies during childbirth , or during breastfeeding. Related Articles.

HIV vs. AIDS: What’s the Difference?

HIV is a virus that attacks a type of white blood cell called a CD4 cell in the body's immune system. It reduces the body's ability to fight infection and illness.

The body can fight off many viruses, but some of them can never be completely removed once they are present. HIV is one of these. However, treatment with antiretroviral therapy can minimize the effect of the virus by slowing or halting its progression. Treatment can now reduce the amount of virus in the bloodstream to levels where it is no longer detectable.

This means the body remains healthy, and the virus cannot be transmitted. AIDS is a syndrome, or range of symptoms, that may develop in time in a person with HIV who does not receive treatment. This increases the risk of developing an opportunistic infection or health condition. Some of these conditions can be life-threatening. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC define opportunistic infections as "infections that occur more frequently and are more severe in individuals with weakened immune systems.

Examples of opportunistic infections and other diseases that can develop in those with HIV include:. There may also be co-infections, which is when two infections tend to occur together, for example , TB and cryptococcal disease, or a combination of TB, hepatitis B , and hepatitis C. It is diagnosed based on a CD4 cell count or the development of one or more opportunistic infections.

Stage 1 is the acute stage of HIV and stage 2 is the clinical latency stage. More information on these two stages is included later in the article. According to AIDS. The rate at which the virus progresses depends on many factors, including the patient's age, general health, genetics, the presence of other infections, and standard of health care. Those who use medication are unlikely ever to have it. Current treatment can reduce levels of the HIV virus to the extent that levels of virus in the blood are too low to be significant.

These levels are undetectable. While the virus is undetectable, it does not affect the person's daily life, and it will not necessarily shorten their lifespan. At this point, the virus is also untransmittable. It cannot be passed on to another person. If a person seeks treatment in the early stages and follows it throughout their life, they can usually expect to live as long as a person without HIV. AIDS was first recognized as a distinct condition in Health workers started noticing that an unusual number of opportunistic infections and cancers appeared to be affecting particular groups of people.

Once people had the virus, their immunity to certain diseases would decrease over time, and the syndrome, AIDS, would develop.

The cause of the problem was traced back to a retrovirus, the human immunodeficiency virus, HIV It is essential to follow specific guidelines when using and disposing of needles and other sharp objects that may pierce the skin. People who do not have HIV but who are at risk of contracting the virus can protect themselves through pre-exposure prophylaxis PrEP.

Under the brand name Truvuda, this pill contains two medications — tenofovir and emtricitabine — that can stop the virus from taking hold, even if exposure occurs. According to the guidelines from the U. The symptoms of HIV vary widely. They depend on the individual, management of the virus, and the stage of the condition.

In the first stage of HIV, 2 to 4 weeks after getting the virus, people can experience flu-like symptoms including:. Not everyone with HIV will experience these symptoms. Some people do not experience symptoms for 10 years or more. During stage 2, the virus is active but reproduces at very low levels. At this stage, there may be only mild symptoms, or none at all.

Medication can help stop the virus from progressing and keep it in this stage. It can reduce the levels of the virus so that they are undetectable, cannot be passed on, and have no impact on the person's health. AIDS is different from HIV, and it is a distinct diagnosis, although it is considered to be the third and final stage of the virus. Symptoms at this stage are related to the various infections that may develop. They can vary greatly. The symptoms associated with AIDS vary widely, and a diagnosis cannot be made on this basis.

Tests will be needed to make a formal diagnosis. This is because they vary widely and they can also be a sign of other conditions. HIV is diagnosed by a blood test or oral swab that looks for the presence of antibodies produced by the body in an attempt to fight the virus, as well as the proteins produced by the virus during replication. The time taken for these antibodies to show up in blood can range from several weeks to several months. However, early testing is always advisable, as an appropriate treatment plan can then be implemented to help stop further progression of the virus.

Those who get tested early after exposure are at a lower risk of transmitting the virus to others, as they can receive effective treatment. Proper treatment plans and early intervention mean those with HIV can enjoy a good quality of life. Treatment will be provided by a team of professionals, not only doctors.

Without treatment, a person who develops AIDS can expect to live for another 3 years, unless they experience a life-threatening complication. Treatment consists primarily of medication, including antiretroviral therapy ART. Once treatment starts, it is important to continue, or drug resistance can develop.

A person who has a diagnosis of HIV can delay or prevent AIDS from developing by seeking early treatment and following the treatment plan as recommended.

It is also important to avoid exposure to other infections and to maintain a healthful lifestyle to support the immune system. Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Prevention. If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works. HIV may be transmitted in a number of ways such as through unprotected sex and during childbirth. HIV is diagnosed with a blood test, and early testing is always recommended. Home HIV test kits: Uses, what to expect, and benefits.